Tomila Lankina is featured in LSE’s research news

Tomila Lankina was featured by the LSE’s research news websites. She emphasizes the importance of the media analysis in foreign policy studies:

As Russia has pursued an increasingly aggressive foreign policy in recent years, a new study argues that media monitoring can shed light on the Kremlin’s opaque decision-making and help explain Russian president Vladimir Putin’s tight grip on power, despite his domestic economic woes.

New research paper in PONARS Eurasia

A new research paper by Rodion Skovoroda and Tomila Lankina entitled Fabricating Votes for Putin: New Tests of Fraud and Electoral Manipulations from Russia has been published in Post-Soviet Affairs.

Lankina, Tomila V. (2016) It’s not all negative: Russian media’s flexible coverage of protest as a regime survival strategy No. 449. PONARS Eurasia, Washington, DC, USA.

Continue reading “New research paper in PONARS Eurasia”

Tomila Lankina on BBC Radio 4

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Sarah Kendall, Ellie Taylor, Luke Kempner, Pippa Evans and Dr. Tomila Lankina to present the news via topical stand up and sketches on BBC Radio 4. Some of the topics up for discussion in this week’s episode: US election result;, Trump; the soothing powers of the word of the year; Putin; and puppets.
Audio file is available on the PONARS Eurasia website.

Whom do Russian protesters blame (and why it matters)?

Katerina Tertytchnaya and Tomila Lankina, 20 September 2016

In recent years, economic hardship in Russia has led to an increase in industrial and socioeconomic protest activity across regions. Protests over wage arrears, strikes and hunger strikes were particularly prominent in the first 8 months of the current year. And although the Russian Communist Party (KPRF) is particularly active in coordinating protest events across Russia’s regions, many protest events are spontaneous and grass-roots based. Overall, beyond labor protests, Russians appear very concerned about housing issues and the increase in prices for services such as transport. In this post we analyze variation in protest activity over time and across types of protests to study whom protesters pursuing various causes blame. We do so by studying where protest events take place (for example, whether they take place in front of the local town hall or regional parliament), the slogans and expressions protesters use, the images and text on their placards and posters, as well as journalistic descriptions of the events. Protest data for this analysis are harvested from namarsh.ru. Focusing on blame attribution during protest events in order to understand public opinion has several advantages over employing more abstract concepts like economic voting patterns. (On the question and analysis of Russian protests in recent years, see a report by CEPR). The protest categories we employ here further allow us to study patterns of blame attribution depending on the causes advanced in each of the events.

Continue reading “Whom do Russian protesters blame (and why it matters)?”

Presentation of research at APSA

Tomila Lankina and Katerina Tertytchnaya have presented their work on the effects of regional protests on public opinion at the 112th Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association which took place on 1-4 September 2016 in Philadelphia.The paper analyzes the extent to which the 2011-2012 sub-national electoral protests in Russia swayed public opinion towards the protesters’ demands. An earlier version of this paper had been also presented at the Annual Meeting of the European Political Science Association (EPSA) in Brussels in June 2016. The paper is available here: Tertytchnaya_Lankina_APSA_Paper_and_Appendix

Member of the project awarded Fulbright-Schuman Fellowship

Katerina Tertytchnaya, who analyses protest trends in Russia for the project, has recently been awarded a Fulbright-Schuman Fellowship to conduct research at Columbia University in New York. During this time, Katerina will research how economic sanctions affected domestic politics and presidential approval in Russia. She will continue to work closely with the Popular Mobilization project team, bringing together evidence from public opinion, media analysis and protest trends. The Fulbright-Schuman Program is jointly financed by the U.S. State Department and the Directorate-General for Education and Culture of the European Commission.

Is Putinism Sustainable? Roundtable discussion, LSE, 19 May 2016

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s confrontational foreign policy continues to impose high costs on his country, contributing to economic decline, continued corruption, and political isolation. A shrinking circle of people around the Kremlin is involved in opaque decision-making while economic and social problems are given less consideration than political and security issues. To what extent is Russia’s regressive path sustainable? What is the role of Russian elites both at home and in exile in influencing the policies of the Russian government in the short and medium-term? How do European governments and business communities assess the sustainability of the Putin system? Should we expect a rise in socio-economic and political discontent in the coming months leading up to Russia’s fall 2016 parliamentary elections?

To discuss these issues, the LSE International Relations Department will be holding a roundtable panel involving leading experts on Russian domestic and foreign policies including fellows from the Transatlantic Academy in Washington, DC.

More information on this event