LSS model for protest framing analysis is available now

Our framing analysis tool is now publicly available in the LSS package. We performed analysis of Russian media’s framing of street protests using a system developed in Python, but subsequently transferred the ‘trained’ model into R to make it more accessible. We labelled it ‘dictionary’ earlier, but refer to it now as a fitted Latent Semantic Scaling model. Applying the model to news stories one can easily produce plots that are very similar to those in our papers. The values of the score are high when a news article contains framing of street protests as “freedom to protest” and when the score is low, protests are framed as “social disorder.”

Continue reading “LSS model for protest framing analysis is available now”

New research paper on Russian media’s coverage of protests in Ukraine

A research paper by Lankina and Watanabe on the Russian media’s coverage of protests in Ukraine, ‘Russian Spring’ or ‘Spring Betrayal’? The Media as a Mirror of Putin’s Evolving Strategy in Ukraine, has been published in Europe-Asia Studies. A limited number of free copies are available.

Continue reading “New research paper on Russian media’s coverage of protests in Ukraine”

New paper on Russia’s international propaganda during the Ukraine crisis

Kohei Watanabe’s paper on Russia’s international propaganda during the Ukraine crisis, The spread of the Kremlin’s narratives by a western news agency during the Ukraine crisis, is published in the Journal of International Communication.

Continue reading “New paper on Russia’s international propaganda during the Ukraine crisis”

Tomila Lankina’s work has recently featured in LSE’s Research Highlights showcasing cutting-edge research conducted at LSE

Click here to see Dr. Lankina’s research featured in a post on LSE Research Highlights in which she discusses the importance of analysing media as a tool for understanding the “black box” of Russia’s domestic and foreign policy making:

As Russia has pursued an increasingly aggressive foreign policy in recent years, a new study argues that media monitoring can shed light on the Kremlin’s opaque decision-making and help explain Russian president Vladimir Putin’s tight grip on power, despite his domestic economic woes.

New PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo on Russian media

Lankina, Tomila V. (2016) It’s Not All Negative: Russian Media’s Flexible Coverage of Protest as a Regime Survival Strategy, No. 449. PONARS Eurasia, Washington, DC, USA.

Pundits continue to debate whether economic shocks, public discontent at home, and isolation abroad will shake President Vladimir Putin’s regime. Much of the commentary on Putin’s survival strategies has focused on repression and aggressive military posturing. This somewhat obscures another important strategy: being highly sensitive to the public mood, deftly reacting to public sentiment, and effecting rapid policy shifts to moderate public dissent.

Continue reading “New PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo on Russian media”

Tomila Lankina on BBC Radio 4

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Sarah Kendall, Ellie Taylor, Luke Kempner, Pippa Evans and Dr. Tomila Lankina to present the news via topical stand up and sketches on BBC Radio 4. Some of the topics up for discussion in this week’s episode: US election result;, Trump; the soothing powers of the word of the year; Putin; and puppets.
Audio file is available on the PONARS Eurasia website.