Recent podcast on Russia’s 2018 presidential elections, political opposition and protests

LSE IGA organised a public panel on “Politics and Political Opposition in Russia,” with participation by Vladimir Kara-Murza, Professor Richard Sakwa, Professor Tomila Lankina and Vladimir Ashurkov, chaired by LSE IGA Visiting Fellow, Oksana Antonenko. It was followed by the screening of Vladimir Kara-Murza’s documentary film, “Nemtsov.”

Listen to podcast here.

Recent presentations and podcasts on Russia’s media strategies

Podcast on Russia’s 2018 presidential elections, political opposition and protest, 30 November 2017.

LSE IGA organised a public panel on “Politics and Political Opposition in Russia,” with participation by Vladimir Kara-Murza, Professor Richard Sakwa, Professor Tomila Lankina and Vladimir Ashurkov, chaired by LSE IGA Visiting Fellow, Oksana Antonenko. It was followed by the screening of Vladimir Kara-Murza’s documentary film, “Nemtsov.”

Listen to podcast here.

Talk at the Frontline Club on Russia’s Role in the Global ‘Information War’, 12 October 2017

Voice of America interview on Russian media (in Russian).

Presentation on Russia’s media strategies at a PONARS Eurasia conference in Washington, DC on Rethinking Russian Media Strategy and Influence.

For a podcast of a previous PONARS Eurasia event in which T. Lankina and other Russia experts discuss media manipulation in the context of Russia’s elections and popular mobilization click here.

 

BBC Radio 4 documentary: Long Road to Change (with T. Lankina interview)

This is an excellent recent documentary on the resurgence of mass activism globally, on the challenges that protesters face, and on strategies that they employ to overcome those challenges.  Description from the BBC website:

“In an age when technology has made organising protest movements easier than ever before, journalist Zoe Williams asks why we aren’t seeing long-term results. She looks back on the global history of activism to discover the pre-conditions needed for concrete change.

Recent years have seen an explosion of protest movements to secure equality, protect immigrants, and demand justice. But often these movements are doomed to short-term impact. Does today’s activism overlook the benefits of doing things the hard way?

By digging into the archives, Zoe looks back to the most impactful protest movements of the 20th century that permanently changed history. By analysing what key elements are needed for success, she will construct new rules of modern-day activism for future generations.

Zoe speaks to former civil rights organiser Marshall Ganz, and considers whether social media can work with traditional methods of protesting by speaking with a co-founder of UK Uncut and digital activists who studied the unprecedented success of Euromaidan in Ukraine.

Some activists believe the issue lies in how we measure the success of movements. Co-founder of the global Occupy protests, Micah White, explains how the failure of his movement showed him how activism needs to be redefined.

Finally, Zoe investigates how to overcome the obstacles that stand in the way of any protest – from radicals that disrupt non-violent marches to handling media coverage – and how government bodies may manipulate protests to their own advantage.”

Is Putinism Sustainable? Roundtable discussion, LSE, 19 May 2016

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s confrontational foreign policy continues to impose high costs on his country, contributing to economic decline, continued corruption, and political isolation. A shrinking circle of people around the Kremlin is involved in opaque decision-making while economic and social problems are given less consideration than political and security issues. To what extent is Russia’s regressive path sustainable? What is the role of Russian elites both at home and in exile in influencing the policies of the Russian government in the short and medium-term? How do European governments and business communities assess the sustainability of the Putin system? Should we expect a rise in socio-economic and political discontent in the coming months leading up to Russia’s fall 2016 parliamentary elections?

To discuss these issues, the LSE International Relations Department will be holding a roundtable panel involving leading experts on Russian domestic and foreign policies including fellows from the Transatlantic Academy in Washington, DC.

More information on this event