Release of Lankina Russian Protest Event Dataset

The Lankina Russian Protest Event Dataset has been now released.  The dataset, codebook and accompanying information sheet can be downloaded from my LSE website.

Data for the Russian protest dataset were collected from namarsh.ru (Новости протеста section in left-hand sidebar), a website run by Russian opposition activists and dedicated to harvesting and dissemination of information on protests occurring throughout Russia. I began collecting and inputting the data in 2007, shortly after the website namarsh.ru had been set up. I expanded the range of variables over the years, particularly after the 2011-2012 protests wave, which highlighted the value of having nuanced baseline protest data to analyze protest dynamics in Russia overtime and to be able to pursue comparative analysis of protest in a variety of national and sub-national contexts. The namarsh.ru website aggregates dispatches from a network of regional correspondents and from press and online reports. The dataset only records what the researchers deemed genuine protest events, meaning that events organized by the ruling United Russia party or pro-government youth movements, such as Nashi were not included. For most variables, the data cover the years 2007-2016. Data for some variables are only available beginning in 2009 or later. However, researchers using the dataset would be able to refer to the web-links to protest stories to extract data for the other years, as required for a specific research project. Although the dataset records all protests listed on the namarsh.ru website, and this remains one of the most, if not the most comprehensive sources of over-time data on regional protests, this is not a comprehensive source of protest activism in Russia. Some protests are over-reported and others are under-reported on the namarsh.ru website. These caveats are discussed in the various publications in which the data were used. In employing these data, users may wish to refer to the publications listed below that discuss the merits and limitations of the data. These publications also illustrate the utility of the dataset when analyzing various aspects of the political process in Russia and other autocracies, for instance, media manipulation of information on protest; or the links between electoral fraud and protest activism. Over the years, several researchers have contributed to the creation of the dataset. Aleksey Savrasov and Alisa Voznaya worked on the project during the early stages of data gathering. Dr Katerina Tertytchnaya’s work on the dataset has been particularly invaluable over the last few years; she has taken the “driver’s seat” in many ways concerning the coding and design aspects of the data.

Recent podcast on Russia’s 2018 presidential elections, political opposition and protests

LSE IGA organised a public panel on “Politics and Political Opposition in Russia,” with participation by Vladimir Kara-Murza, Professor Richard Sakwa, Professor Tomila Lankina and Vladimir Ashurkov, chaired by LSE IGA Visiting Fellow, Oksana Antonenko. It was followed by the screening of Vladimir Kara-Murza’s documentary film, “Nemtsov.”

Listen to podcast here.

Recent presentations and podcasts on Russia’s media strategies

Podcast on Russia’s 2018 presidential elections, political opposition and protest, 30 November 2017.

LSE IGA organised a public panel on “Politics and Political Opposition in Russia,” with participation by Vladimir Kara-Murza, Professor Richard Sakwa, Professor Tomila Lankina and Vladimir Ashurkov, chaired by LSE IGA Visiting Fellow, Oksana Antonenko. It was followed by the screening of Vladimir Kara-Murza’s documentary film, “Nemtsov.”

Listen to podcast here.

Talk at the Frontline Club on Russia’s Role in the Global ‘Information War’, 12 October 2017

Voice of America interview on Russian media (in Russian).

Presentation on Russia’s media strategies at a PONARS Eurasia conference in Washington, DC on Rethinking Russian Media Strategy and Influence.

For a podcast of a previous PONARS Eurasia event in which T. Lankina and other Russia experts discuss media manipulation in the context of Russia’s elections and popular mobilization click here.

 

BBC Radio 4 documentary: Long Road to Change (with T. Lankina interview)

This is an excellent recent documentary on the resurgence of mass activism globally, on the challenges that protesters face, and on strategies that they employ to overcome those challenges.  Description from the BBC website:

“In an age when technology has made organising protest movements easier than ever before, journalist Zoe Williams asks why we aren’t seeing long-term results. She looks back on the global history of activism to discover the pre-conditions needed for concrete change.

Recent years have seen an explosion of protest movements to secure equality, protect immigrants, and demand justice. But often these movements are doomed to short-term impact. Does today’s activism overlook the benefits of doing things the hard way?

By digging into the archives, Zoe looks back to the most impactful protest movements of the 20th century that permanently changed history. By analysing what key elements are needed for success, she will construct new rules of modern-day activism for future generations.

Zoe speaks to former civil rights organiser Marshall Ganz, and considers whether social media can work with traditional methods of protesting by speaking with a co-founder of UK Uncut and digital activists who studied the unprecedented success of Euromaidan in Ukraine.

Some activists believe the issue lies in how we measure the success of movements. Co-founder of the global Occupy protests, Micah White, explains how the failure of his movement showed him how activism needs to be redefined.

Finally, Zoe investigates how to overcome the obstacles that stand in the way of any protest – from radicals that disrupt non-violent marches to handling media coverage – and how government bodies may manipulate protests to their own advantage.”