Is Putinism Sustainable? Roundtable discussion, LSE, 19 May 2016

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s confrontational foreign policy continues to impose high costs on his country, contributing to economic decline, continued corruption, and political isolation. A shrinking circle of people around the Kremlin is involved in opaque decision-making while economic and social problems are given less consideration than political and security issues. To what extent is Russia’s regressive path sustainable? What is the role of Russian elites both at home and in exile in influencing the policies of the Russian government in the short and medium-term? How do European governments and business communities assess the sustainability of the Putin system? Should we expect a rise in socio-economic and political discontent in the coming months leading up to Russia’s fall 2016 parliamentary elections?

To discuss these issues, the LSE International Relations Department will be holding a roundtable panel involving leading experts on Russian domestic and foreign policies including fellows from the Transatlantic Academy in Washington, DC.

More information on this event

Ukraine crisis timeline and news coverage of Euromaidan protests

Coverage of the Euromaidan protests by select Russian state-controlled media (Rossiyskaya gazeta, Komsomolskaya pravda, Izvestiya newspapers; and Russia 1, Channel 1 and NTV TV channels); and independent Russian and Ukrainian media sources (Rosbalt, Interfax and Zerkalo nedeli). Lower values (“score” line) represent a tendency to portray protests as disorder, while higher values indicate a freedom to protest trend in the media framing of protests. K1-K4 represent spikes in media coverage of protest.